Outside interest: running and swimming

Written by: Jez Abbott
Published on: 14 Oct 2015
Category:

Kathryn WilliamsWhen she's not in the office, JLL senior planner Kathryn Williams is swimming and running and has taken part in half marathons and charity runs. Though injury has limited her running activities, she swims every week to keep body and mind in good shape.

How did you get into running and swimming?

I started running in 2008 with colleagues from our London office. JLL takes part in lots of sporting and charity events such as Regent's Park runs and the Property Triathlon. I completed my first 10k race that year and have run several half marathons since. A couple of years ago I did the Cardiff half marathon and crossed the finish line in just under two hours – a first for me. Knee injuries have limited my running in recent years, but I swim every week to keep in trim and keep my competitive edge nice and sharp. 

What does it involve?

Practice and preparation are crucial to competitive running, so in my running prime I was running for well over an hour on a fairly regular basis. Swimming involves 35 to 40 lengths, which I sneak in while my son is taking swimming lessons.

Why do you do it?

I do sport for health and fitness but also mental wellbeing. When I swim, for example, I concentrate on my breathing rhythm, and the activity gives me 40 minutes to myself for some good-quality thinking.

What’s the toughest thing about it?

The thought of spending an hour and a half training for a big event and pushing myself to the next level of fitness is not always the most enjoyable prospect. But I'm competitive, so always set myself targets, such as an extra couple of kilometres to a run.

What’s the most rewarding thing about it?

Best thing about sport is the adrenalin buzz and the fun of competing. Once you've completed the event, you forget all the hard work you endured to get race fit.

Are there any similarities between your day job and running and swimming?

Organisation is a must for both planning and swimming. Training for big events involves setting aside time and focusing on strategic thinking. Once you've committed to a project or race, you have to follow through to your best ability.

Do you have any unusual interests or hobbies that you would like to tell us about? If so, please email planning@haymarket.com